Personality Styles

If you haven’t already, take the free online personality quiz.
Then, learn more about each of the personality styles by clicking on the pictures below.

If you haven’t already, take the free online personality quiz. Then, learn more about each of the personality styles by clicking on the pictures below.

If you haven’t already, take the
free online personality quiz.

Then, learn more about each
of the personality styles by
clicking on the pictures below.

mover personality style

connector personality style

thinker personality style

planner personality style

Each of these four personality styles represent a grouping of observable character traits and behaviors.

Your overall personality is made up of all four personality styles in different amounts.

Your personality starts with an inborn disposition yet changes over time as you interact with your environment.

Each of the four personality styles has driving needs and values that energize behavior.

Where do these four Personality Styles come from?

Personality Lingo Personality Styles Used with Permission

The personality style descriptor terms Mover, Connector, Thinker, and Planner are used with permission from Personality Lingo.

+ LEARN MORE about Personality Lingo

Personality Lingo is a fun easy way to identify personality patterns and understand why people behave as they do. It uses everyday language to help you comprehend and discuss the way you see the world and how you interact with others. Personality Lingo takes you beyond the basics of personality style identification providing practical applications for appreciating differences, communicating more effectively, and navigating the stress we encounter in our everyday lives.

References to letter codes and color codes are often included alongside the personality style descriptor terms in parenthesis as follows:

Connector (NF-Blue), Planner (SJ-Gold), Thinker (NT-Green), Mover (SP-Orange)

These Personality Styles are in alignment with the Four Fundamental Temperaments fist described by David Keirsey in his 1978 book, “Please Understand Me”.

Personality Lingo is a fun easy way to identify personality patterns and understand why people behave as they do. It uses everyday language to help you comprehend and discuss the way you see the world and how you interact with others. Personality Lingo takes you beyond the basics of personality style identification providing practical applications for appreciating differences, communicating more effectively, and navigating the stress we encounter in our everyday lives.

References to letter codes and color codes are often included alongside the personality style descriptor terms in parenthesis as follows:

Connector (NF-Blue)
Planner (SJ-Gold)
Thinker (NT-Green)
Mover (SP-Orange)

These four Personality Styles are in alignment with the Four Fundamental Temperaments fist described by David Keirsey in his 1978 book, “Please Understand Me”.

David-Keirsey-Temperaments

After 20 years working in public schools as a school psychologist, David Keirsey, used his knowledge of Carl Jung’s Mental Mechanisms and the MBTI letter-code designations to associate human behavior with four fundamental temperaments and sixteen role variants. In his book “Please Understand Me”, Keirsey defined the following Four Fundamental Temperaments.

Artisan – Dionysian (SP)
Idealist – Apollonian (NF)
Rational – Promethean (NT)
Guardian – Epimethean (SJ)

David Keirsey’s Temperament Theory is highly insightful and extremely useful. However, the complexity of the terminology kept the theory somewhat out of reach for anyone who wasn’t an educator interested in psychological type theory and human behavior.

Let’s examine a quote from his book “Please Understand Me”.

The purposes of SPs, SJs, and NTs are understood by SPs, SJs, and NTs alike, although they may not embrace them. The NT can understand the SPs desire to be free of responsibility just as he can understand the SJs satisfaction in its possession. So can the SP see the NTs desire to store up capabilities and the SJs desire to store up commodities. He would be the last to look a gift horse in the mouth, for that matter, since these stores tend to be given out to those who need them. The SJ even admires the NT for his technical storehouse and envies the SP for his generous and receiving nature. But here the mutual understanding of purposes ends. None of these understand the aim of the NF, and in turn, the NF cannot really grasp the others’ commitment to what seems to the NF to be false goals. For the NF pursues a strange end, a self-reflective end which defies itself: becoming… (The NFs) purpose in life is to have a purpose in life. How can one achieve a goal when that goal is to have a goal?

If we replace the letter codes with the Personality Lingo terms for the personality styles, this paragraph becomes easier to comprehend and discuss.

The purposes of Movers, Planners, and Thinkers are understood by Movers, Planners, and Thinkers alike, although they may not embrace them. The Thinker can understand the Mover’s desire to be free of responsibility just as he can understand the Planner’s satisfaction in its possession. So can the Mover see the Thinker’s desire to store up capabilities and the Planner’s desire to store up commodities. He would be the last to look a gift horse in the mouth, for that matter, since these stores tend to be given out to those who need them. The Planner even admires the Thinker for his technical storehouse and envies the Mover for his generous and receiving nature. But here the mutual understanding of purposes ends. None of these understand the aim of the Connector, and in turn, the Connector cannot really grasp the others’ commitment to what seems to the Connector to be false goals. For the Connector pursues a strange end, a self-reflective end which defies itself: becoming… (The Connectors) purpose in life is to have a purpose in life. How can one achieve a goal when that goal is to have a goal?

Where do the Letter Codes come from?

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) identifies 16 psychological types which are referred to by an abbreviation of four letters. One letter selected for each preference between the pairs of Mental Mechanisms.

MBTI letter codes to describe the styles

A two-digit MBTI letter-code can be used to represent each of the four personality styles – Connector (NF), Planner (SJ), Thinker (NT), and Mover (SP)

F is for “Feeling” for those who make decisions subjectively

T is for “Thinking” for those who make decisions objectively

J is for “Judging” for people who like to have decisions made in advance

P is for “Perceiving” for people who make decisions in the moment

S is for “Sensing” for gathering information through the five senses

N is for “Intuitive” for gathering information through means of insights and pattern recognition

You will notice that the Introversion and Extraversion letter codes are not used to represent the personality styles. Each personality style can either be Introverted or Extroverted.

Personality Academy has built upon the mission of Personality Lingo to use everyday language to help you comprehend and discuss the way you see the world and how you interact with others. The terms that Personality Academy uses to describe the Jungian Mental Mechanisms (or mental functions) are summarized below:

Personality Academy Personality Styles

The “Feeling” function becomes “Making Decisions Subjectively”

The “Thinking” function becomes “Making Decisions Objectively”

The “Judging” function becomes “Planned Mode of Operation”

The “Perceiving” function becomes “Spontaneous Mode of Operation”

The “Sensing” function becomes “Hands-On Gathering of Information”

The “Intuitive” function becomes “Theoretical Gathering of Information”

Personality Academy Personality Styles

Personality Academy has built upon the mission of Personality Lingo to use everyday language to help you comprehend and discuss the way you see the world and how you interact with others. The terms that Personality Academy uses to describe the Jungian Mental Mechanisms (or mental functions) are summarized below:

The “Feeling” function becomes “Making Decisions Subjectively”

The “Thinking” function becomes “Making Decisions Objectively”

The “Judging” function becomes “Planned Mode of Operation”

The “Perceiving” function becomes “Spontaneous Mode of Operation”

The “Sensing” function becomes “Hands-On Gathering of Information”

The “Intuitive” function becomes “Theoretical Gathering of Information”

Neuroscience of Personality

The science is in! Professor Dario Nardi at the University of California at Los Angeles has discovered patterns of brain activity supporting the existence of the Jungian Mental Mechanisms. There’s more! While the Four Fundamental Temperaments provide insights into our needs and values – there are other four-digit MBTI letter-codes representing other aspects of our personality. 

Neuroscience of Personality

The science is in! Professor Dario Nardi at the University of California at Los Angeles has discovered patterns of brain activity supporting the existence of the Jungian Mental Mechanisms. There’s more! While the Four Fundamental Temperaments provide insights into our needs and values – there are other four-digit MBTI letter-codes representing other aspects of our personality. 

Where do the Color Codes come from?

Don Lowry is credited as being one of the first in modern times to simplify much of the complicated psychological language by assigning each temperament an easy to remember color. The colors were selected to represent a mood or metaphor.

NF-Blue: The color blue fosters psychological contentment and physical tranquility. This color has been shown to soothe the central nervous system.

SJ-Gold: The color gold represents value, stability, and strength. Associated metaphors include “good as gold” and “gold standard.”

NT-Green: The color green is an expression of logic and the systems of nature. This is a refreshing color associated with nourishment and growth.

SP-Orange: The color orange urges you to wake up, pay attention, and seize the moment. It is a color often used to promote action, motivation, and excitement.

Don Lowry's True Colors